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The Caney Fork River is known for its recreation. Canoes and kayaks float down the water any given day. Trout fishing is a favorite pastime of locals and travelers.

The Caney Fork also offers overnight stays for people wanting to extend their trip. At the head of the Caney Fork river is Longbranch Recreational Campground. Along the Caney Fork, there are several other areas to camp as well (make sure it is not private property). The Caney Fork is a public area, but much of the land is privately owned. Please be curteous to the land owners and other water goers as well! The Caney Fork is stocked with plenty of things to do for everyone!

The Caney Fork river is 144 miles long, rising in Cumberland County and flowing NW to the Cumberland. The Caney Fork rises in Cumberland County about six miles west north-west of Crossville. The Caney Fork is crossed by U.S. Route 70 near the tiny community of Clayville, and, flowing southwest, then crosses into White County. At the confluence of the Caney Fork, the Collins River and the Rocky River is Great Falls Lake. Canoes and kayaks tour the waters to take a glimpse at natures beauty.

The Caney Fork river is 144 miles long, rising in Cumberland County and flowing NW to the Cumberland. The Caney Fork rises in Cumberland County about six miles west north-west of Crossville. The Caney Fork is crossed by U.S. Route 70 near the tiny community of Clayville, and, flowing southwest, then crosses into White County. At the confluence of the Caney Fork, the Collins River and the Rocky River is Great Falls Lake. Canoes and kayaks tour the waters to take a glimpse at natures beauty. Trout fishing is also a favorite in the stocked waterway. The Caney Fork River played a large role in the development of DeKalb County by providing drinking water, power and transportation. The Caney Fork River had many grist mills and saw mills established on the many creeks flowing into it. Following the Caney Fork River, one could travel down stream to Nashville and as far away as New Orleans, Louisiana and the Gulf of Mexico. The Caney Fork River banks are lined by abundant stands of virgin timber. Timber from the Caney Fork was cut and mules were used to drag the logs to the bank. At the river banks, the timber was fastened together forming large rafts ranging in size from 20 to 40 feet in width and up to 90 feet in length. Due to river conditions, a tent or other makeshift structure was made to provide shelter to the crew and depending on water conditions the trip downstream to Nashville took from one to two weeks.

The Caney Fork River was also a pearling area for the locals in the 1880's. The Caney Fork was full of mussels that contained a valuable commodity in the form of pearls. From 1885 to about 1915 Smithville became a leading fresh water pearl market with some pearls bringing in over $1,000.00, a considerable amount of money in those days.

 

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